Charles Arnoldi

String Theory II
Etching
40.50 x 34.50 in
Signed, dated and numbered by the artist in pencil. Unframed. Polymer gravure with etching and photo-etching printed in colors from a copper plate, one from the set of three, a fine, fresh impression, the full sheet, printed on 410gsm Somerset UK Textured White paper, with margins, signed, dated and numbered in pencil by the artist, executed in an edition of 45 (there were also proofs), printed by Peter Kosowicz at Thumbprint Editions, London, published by Harvey Bayer, New Jersey and London, in fine condition, unframed. Claiming, “I’m just trying to make art with some sense of dignity, and honesty, and integrity,” Charles Arnoldi has been blurring the boundaries between painting and sculpture, abstraction and representation throughout his long and celebrated career. He started showing his work in the 1970s, consisting of compositions crafted from sticks he would gather from orchards and woods. Whether affixed to the canvas in thick clusters or structured into geometric, openwork wall hangings and sculptures, the sticks both resemble and inform the vigorously painted lines that appear in his later paintings. From sticks, he moved on to pigmented plywood, glued together into thickly layered sheets, which he would shape and mark with a chainsaw. In his more traditional, acrylic-on-canvas paintings, Arnoldi translates nature and architecture into abstract compositions that hint at their source imagery, including windows, Hawaiian flora, and purple potatoes. In Charles Arnoldi’s 2016 series String Theory, he returns his focus to curvilinear forms. In these etchings, he creates continuous lines that are shaped by the movements of his wrist, elbow, and shoulder. Rather than focusing on the image, Arnoldi tried to produce specific type of movement with his arm in order to create organically curvilinear lines. String Theory is also a theoretical framework in physics which tries to solve the question of quantum gravity as well as explain the ways in which string-like particles propagate through space and interact with each other. While there may or may not be an intentional connection between Arnoldi’s series and the scientific theory, it is interesting to consider the relationship when viewing the works.
String Theory II
https://cdn.artcld.com/img/w_2000,c_fit/fvi4r7g24wqa41nyaswr.jpg
Etching
Charles Arnoldi
Artist
String Theory II by Charles Arnoldi